Jay-Z and Beyoncé’s Blue Ivy Trademark

by T+B Blog Team on February 10, 2012

Celebrity babies are big news. So it wasn’t surprising that it took only two days after the birth of Jay-Z and Beyoncé’s baby girl, Blue Ivy, for someone to file a trademark application for her name. Unfortunately for him, fashion designer Joseph Mbeh’s trademark application was rejected by the USPTO. Mbeh’s attempt was followed on January 26th with a trademark application for Blue Ivy from Beyoncé’s company, BGK Trademark Holdings. The registration was filed in a wide range of categories — from fragrances to strollers to key chains. Here’s a copy of the record from Corsearch® Advantage™:

There is another Blue Ivy trademark on record. That one belongs to a boutique in Wisconsin. Blue Ivy LLC filed for a trademark in International Class 35 (retail store services) in January 2011, before Beyoncé was pregnant, and received approval on August 23.

Both Beyoncé and Jay-Z already have several trademark registrations for their names. Many “stars” register trademarks for their names, as do many estates and production companies affiliated with deceased celebrities (Marilyn Monroe, Marlon Brando, and Groucho Marx, for example).

As for celebrity baby names — this may very well be the first trademark registration for the newborn baby of a celebrity couple. (If you know of any others, please let us know!) Some recent celebrity baby names seem to be a bit more unusual than the names you read on annual Top Baby Names lists. There’s little Audio Science, Harper Seven, Moxie Crimefighter . . . and now Blue Ivy.

What’s your favorite celebrity baby name?

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Arizona Trademark Attorney February 13, 2012 at 11:14 pm

The PTO jumped on another BLUE IVY application filed by another party, rejecting it just 2 weeks after it was filed. Any rules / policies you are aware of that the PTO uses in examining or prioritizing celebrity names or famous names?

T+B Blog Team February 16, 2012 at 9:08 am

Yes, the PTO is rejecting the application based on Section 2(a) False Connection and Section 2(c) Name Identifying a Particular Individual. That provision generally will protect most famous person names.

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